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Effects of habitat instability on toad populations

Most wildlife populations live in habitats that show variation in biotic and abiotic conditions across space and time. This means any given species needs to find ways to deal with such variation in environmental conditions (e.g., local adaptation, phenotypic plasticity...

WELCOME ANDREW GONZALEZ - NEW EDITOR

We want to wish Andrew Gonzalez a warm welcome to the Oikos team! He is a professor at McGill University (Montreal, Canada), Liber Ero Chair in Conservation Biology, Killam Fellow, and the founding director of the Quebec Centre for Biodiversity Science . Andrew has...

Cover September

September's cover shows us a branching coral ( Acropora sp. ) in an area with high urbanization. Read about the impacts of urbanization on marine environments in the study " Towards an urban marine ecology: characterizing the drivers, patterns and processes of marine...

Cover November

The photo for November's Issue shows us an incredible view! What determines whether a plant can survive the rough conditions of the Himalayas? Read about it in the paper " Disentangling evolutionary, environmental and morphological drivers of plant anatomical...

Cover July/August

The photo for our July and August Issues show a Lesser kestrel ( Falco naumanni ) sitting on a stone before a wall with a mouse in its beak. Read the associated paper "Benefits of extra food to reproduction depend on maternal condition" by Podofillini et al. (2019)...

Cover May

The photo of May's issue shows halictid bees from Peru! Check out the related paper " Does the sociality of pollinators shape the organisation of pollination networks? " (Maia et al. 2019)! Photo taken by: Claus Rassmusen

Cover March

Here is our March Cover showing a majestic red deer ( Cervus elaphus )! The image is from the paper " Large herbivore migration plasticity along environmental gradients in Europe: life‐history traits modulate forage effects " found in this issue! Photo taken by: Anders...

Cover October

The photo on the October cover shows a barnacle goose ( Branta leucopsis ) from the paper " Resting metabolic rate in migratory and non‐migratory geese following range expansion: go south, go low " (Eichhorn et al. 2019) found in this issue! Photo taken by: Götz...

Cover June

Our cover for the June issue is a drawing made by Abby McBride. It summarizes the Forum paper "Inclusive fitness, asymmetric competition and kin selection in plants" by Bodil K. Ehlers and trine Bilde. The drawing is one of five that Abby has made to illustrate our...

Welcome Gregor Kalinkat - new SE

We are very happy to welcome Gregor Kalinkat to our editorial board! Read more about him in this interview! What's you main research focus at the moment? I just started a new position as a senior researcher in Franz Hölker's lab at the Leibniz-Institute for Freshwater...

Welcome Ignacio M. Pérez-Ramos - new SE

We are very happy to welcome Ignacio Manuel Pérez-Ramos, Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology (IRNAS); Superior Council of Scientific Research (CSIC), Seville, Spain, to our editorial board. Get to know him a bit better in the interview below, and do visit...

Beauty of collaborative experiments

I always am fascinated by the possibility of tweaking certain parameters and seeing their effects on a given process or a pattern. Experiments are usually my way of doing it. During my post-doc at iDiv, my office was next to a fungal ecologist-Ainhoa Martinez. We often...

Cover April

The photo on the April cover shows two black legged kittiwakes at nests on Puffin Island, one of the three study sites in the paper " Environmental heterogeneity amplifies behavioural response to a temporal cycle ". The paper studies the effect of a predictable...

Do water plants clean up water?

Anyone who has had an aquarium or a garden pond is likely to be familiar with the concept of water plants (macrophytes) helping to keep the water clean. In freshwater lakes, macrophytes are doing exactly that. Recall the lakes that you may have visited—you might notice...

Citizen science shows how predation risk effects can reduce lifetime fitness

Simple observations can sometimes lead to unexpected scientific discoveries. In 1996, wildlife biologist and educator Dick Thiel was musing about the abundance of North American porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) near his home in central Wisconsin. That winter he started...

What happens in the ecosystem if an apex predator is removed?

Our study reports the results of the first broad-scale field study investigating the ecological role of Australia’s largest terrestrial predator, the dingo, in tropical savannah ecosystems. We did this by comparing the abundances of herbivores, an introduced...

Water and the lack of it shape tundra vegetation patterns

Water has a control over vegetation. Whether there is too much or too little of it, it has an impact on the spatial patterns of plants, mosses and lichens. This is evident in arid ecosystems – about but what about cold ecosystems which are considered as temperature...

Editor's Choice March

The first editor’s choice is the forum by Patrick & Yuan: ‘ The challenges that spatial context present for synthesizing community ecology across scales ’. The rationale for their forum is the common mismatch between community theory and its application within a...

How long time does a T. Rex take to digest a seed?

When an animal ingests a seed, how long does it take for the seed to pass through its gut? This is an important question for plant ecologists, because seed retention time (SRT) can determine the distance the seed can travel. A number of studies have measured SRT for a...

WHY this variation in vulnerability?

As I child, I could only dream about the Amazon Rainforest. Few places had such a stronghold on my imagination – a mystical and remote place teeming with unparalleled diversity and exotic creatures. But when, decades later, I made my inaugural trip to Manaus, Brazil, I...

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